Do You Delight Your Customers?

Please welcome Brendan Cosgrove as our guest blogger today.  Brendan has been managing IT infrastrcutures and teams for over 12 years and brings a high-level of expertise and maturity to any IT practice.

The last post here was about keeping your users in the loop and exposing some of the things that we all know can be done behind the scenes without anyone knowing.  It’s a great reminder that while as technologists, either on staff or as contractor/consultants, we are serving people.

In the technology world it is often difficult to lift our heads out of the proverbial sand of server racks, laptops, or Kaseya dashboards and deliver delightful service.  That is usually the last thought on your mind at 2am when you still can’t figure out why your Exchange Store won’t mount.   Instead of worrying about what the CFO or CEO will say when he calls first thing in the morning because he has no new email on his blackberry we should remind ourselves that their frustration with technology is similar to what our frustration would be if every couple weeks our car wouldn’t  start for no apparent reason.  Hopefully your uptime is better than that, but you get the idea.  It’s our job to know what to do with the technology and it’s not your users’ fault that they don’t understand how Murphy’s Law manifests itself in IT.  That is, after all why they hired us.  

As a result of our IT myopia we lose sight of who is receiving the fruits of our labors.  People.  There is always a person at the other end.  I’ve always told my teams that no matter how amazing that login script is, or how much uptime you’ve ensured, it is wasted effort if the end user still doesn’t feel well served by the efforts of their IT department.

Our number one focus should be serving people.  We just happen to be responsible for the IT.  I can’t imagine serving thousands of end users without good tools, but even with good tools if you haven’t delighted your customers internally or externally, you haven’t delivered the very best IT service.

What to take away:

   1. Focus on people and technology, not just technology
   2. Take time to listen to your users and their needs
   3. Make the value of IT tangible to each user
   4. Make sure your servers have a greater uptime than your car 🙂


Brendan Cosgrove has over 12 years experience in IT, both on staff, and as a consultant.  Currently, through his company, the TECHgrove, Brendan does Executive Technology Coaching and blog/newsletter writing for ITSP’s across the country.  You can email him here brendan@theTECHgrove.com or follow him on twitter here: http://twitter.com/cozthegrov

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