3 Things Your Password Management Solution Must Provide

Password Requirements

When was the last time an employee left your company?
Was it one month ago? Two?

Gone are the days of the lifelong career. Sure, if you work in education there’s the possibility of tenured professors, but for the average MSP there’s no such thing, and as such there is a significant amount of employee turnover. No matter how hard you try to retain your employees, some are going to be taken from you, and some of those employees are bound to be technicians.

It’s always sad whenever a technician leaves a company, but the IT security risk their departure leaves behind can linger even longer. You can lock their personal accounts after they leave and have them return their keycards, but you can’t remove all knowledge of you and your clients systems, applications, networks, and the associated usernames and passwords from their minds.

Now consider the ever increasing risk of a data breach, and the value of your clients’ data.

Your clients expect that, along with whatever other services you provide, you will help protect them from the risk of a breach, yet every time a technician leaves your company a set of keys to unlock your clients’ secured systems is being released into the world. Many businesses would be bankrupted by even a single breach, and your ex-employees have the means of walking casually past their security and into their systems. How do you think your clients would feel if they knew that?

As a business working in IT, the security of all systems, your clients’ and your own, must be at the forefront of your focus. When it comes to passwords, you need to have a plan in place which accounts for technicians leaving your company. Many MSPs I’ve seen lack such a plan, and that runs afoul of the oldest IT truism “always be prepared”. To be well prepared, there are three critical features your plan needs to work successfully…

Auditing

Your system, no matter how it’s set up, absolutely needs some auditing functionality. This allows you to check:

  • Who has accessed certain passwords, and when.
  • If the stored passwords are on par with any complexity or compliance requirements.
  • If the stored passwords are accurate and actually match the ones being used.
  • Who the contact with authority is, should something go wrong.

Access control

No technician should ever need to know every single password at any given time. Access control allows you to restrict that access to need-to-know only. The most common way of accomplishing this is be enacting a role-based access model, where users in certain roles have access to certain passwords. At the minimum your system should allow you to:

  • Control who can access certain passwords.
  • Control what access a user has to passwords (read-only, write-only, hidden, etc.)
  • Securely store the passwords in a central location, while providing access to virtually everywhere.

Automation

An excel spreadsheet just won’t cut it for this requirement. Your system needs to be capable of doing most of these tasks automatically. If you tried to do this all manually, the work required would likely be a full-time job of its own. Your system should be able to automate all of the requirements for auditing and access control, while simultaneously being able to:

  • Automatically change and update passwords on a set schedule.
  • Inform those in authority when a password needs changing that cannot be automated.
  • Automatically enter passwords for users who only need it to log in.

Now, a lot of these requirements sound hard to fulfill. And they are, should you try to set this up yourself. That’s just the thing though, if you were solving for the problem of malware, you wouldn’t design your own in-house antivirus. I mean, you might rebrand some open source solution, but that never ends well.

The same method you use to solve for viruses, email, or any other software requirement, can be applied to password management. Let someone else build the tools, so you don’t have to. You don’t need to invent your own password management system, you just need a password management solution.

While you’re looking for a password management solution, let me throw one more factor into the mix. If you’re reading this blog at blog.kaseya.com, there’s a good chance that you’re likely a Kaseya customer. If you are, or you’re interested in becoming one, make sure that the solution you choose supports a Kaseya integration. That way you can accomplish even more from a single pane of glass.

If you want more information on what you need from a password management system: Click Here

If you want to know what I would recommend as a password management system: Click Here

Author: Harrison Depner

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