IT Management Community Participation Extends Knowledge and Adds Value

Waltham Community Meetup

This week I attended a Kaseya “Local Meetup” event in Waltham, Massachusetts, and it struck me again just how important it is to have a strong IT community. In the Meetup evaluation forms, virtually everyone who attended said that sharing ideas with like-minded people was a key benefit to attending the event. Without exception, everyone left the meeting with new contacts and friendships in the IT management community.

A few things about the meeting really hit home:

Tips and Tricks:

Kirk Feathers, a leader in the Kaseya technical community, led a “Tips and Tricks” session, sharing interesting and innovative approaches to maximize the usage and benefit of IT management tools, both from Kaseya and its partners. Everyone in the room chimed in, asking questions and offering their own insights. Copious notes were being taken. And more than once, two or more people set up follow on conversations on particular topics.

Collaboration Groups:

Establishing collaboration groups is a great way to stay in touch and share information. Chris Anderson, Director of Managed Services for Infranet Solutions in Quincy Massachusetts, shared a great story about collaboration groups. I met Chris earlier this year at “Kaseya Connect,” our annual user conference. During his three days at the event, Chris made it a point to build out his community contacts to the point where he is now part of a formal group which is sharing automation scripts. Using existing scripts and creating new ones is key to efficiently and effectively managing large numbers of endpoints. Chris tells me that the collaboration group’s sharing of ideas and actual scripts is substantially improving their speed-to-automation.

Feedback and Input:

Mads Srinivasan, product manager for Kaseya’s mobility management solution, shared the latest mobility management development work, complete with a demonstration. The purpose was to obtain feedback and input from the group on the features and presentation layer. The session had a good 30 minutes of excellent feedback and suggestions. Mads had an ulterior motive in that he wants 100 beta customers to test out the latest work; virtually everyone in the room signed up.

Time before and after the event was reserved for networking and everyone took advantage. People had a chance to meet the many Kaseya leaders who were present, but more importantly, they built out their IT management community connections. By the end of the event, business cards were swapped, and emails were exchanged all around.

This experience also reinforced the importance of the “Kaseya Community” program, which includes sponsoring these local Meetups, forums for sharing, event postings, etc. All Kaseya users should join to share information and learn about the latest happenings.

Author: Tom Hayes

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